Comprehensive Eye Exam

A comprehensive eye exam is important for everyone annually regardless of visual complaints. The American Optometric Association recommends yearly eye examinations. It is important that an eye care professional checks not only for the need of glasses or contact lens prescriptions but the overall health of the ocular system. Many eye conditions do not cause visual complaints and therefore cannot be detected without a thorough examination. Early detection is always the best way of preventing visual loss. A comprehensive eye exam typically includes a discussion about medical/ocular history, testing of visual acuity, refraction, evaluation of the retina (back of the eye) and a review of all the results with your optometrist. Contact us today to schedule your comprehensive eye exam. 

Myopia affects nearly 30 percent of the U.S. population. While the exact cause of myopia is unknown, there is significant evidence that many people inherit myopia, or at least the tendency to develop myopia. If one or both parents are nearsighted, there is an increased chance their children will be nearsighted. 

Even though the tendency to develop myopia may be inherited, its actual development may be affected by how a person uses his or her eyes. Individuals who spend considerable time reading, working at a computer, or doing other intense close visual work may be more likely to develop myopia.

Generally, myopia first occurs in school-age children. Because the eye continues to grow during childhood, it typically progresses until about age 20. However, myopia may also develop in adults due to visual stress or health conditions such as diabetes.

Farsightedness, or hyperopia, as it is medically termed, is a vision condition in which distant objects can be seen clearly, but close ones do not come into proper focus. Farsightedness occurs if your eyeball is too short or the cornea has too little curvature. In these cases, your eye can't correctly focus the light that enters it.

Common signs of hyperopia include difficulty concentrating and maintaining a clear focus on near objects, eye strain, fatigue and/or headaches after close work, aching or burning eyes, and irritability or nervousness after sustained concentration.

 

Common vision screenings, like the ones done in schools, often don't detect hyperopia. However, a comprehensive optometric examination will include the necessary testing to diagnose hyperopia. If needed, your optometrist can offer treatment options.In mild cases of farsightedness, your eyes may be able to compensate without corrective lenses. In other cases, your optometrist can prescribe eyeglasses or contact lenses that alter the way the light enters your eyes, allowing you to clearly see close objects.
 

Even though the tendency to develop myopia may be inherited, its actual development may be affected by how a person uses his or her eyes. Individuals who spend considerable time reading, working at a computer, or doing other intense close visual work may be more likely to develop myopia.

Presbyopia is a vision condition in which the shape of the crystalline lens of your eye changes. These changes make it difficult to focus on close objects.

Presbyopia may seem to occur suddenly, but sight reduction occurs over a number of years. Presbyopia usually becomes noticeable in the early to mid-40s, but the reduction of your accommodation starts as early as childhood. 

Presbyopia is a natural part of the aging process of the eye. It is not a disease, and it cannot be prevented.

Some signs of presbyopia include holding reading materials at arm's length, blurred vision at normal reading distance and eye fatigue along with headaches when doing close work. A comprehensive optometric examination will include testing for presbyopia.

To help you compensate for presbyopia, your optometrist can prescribe reading glasses, multifocals or contact lenses. Presbyopia can complicate other common vision conditions like nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. Your optometrist will determine the specific lenses to allow you to see clearly and comfortably. You may only need to wear your glasses for close work like reading, but you may find that wearing them all the time is more convenient and helpful.

The effects of presbyopia will continue over your lifetime. Therefore, you may need to periodically change your eyewear to maintain clear and comfortable vision.

Presbyopia is a vision condition in which the shape of the crystalline lens of your eye changes. These changes make it difficult to focus on close objects.

Presbyopia may seem to occur suddenly, but sight reduction occurs over a number of years. Presbyopia usually becomes noticeable in the early to mid-40s, but the reduction of your accommodation starts as early as childhood. 

Presbyopia is a natural part of the aging process of the eye. It is not a disease, and it cannot be prevented.

Some signs of presbyopia include holding reading materials at arm's length, blurred vision at normal reading distance and eye fatigue along with headaches when doing close work. A comprehensive optometric examination will include testing for presbyopia.

To help you compensate for presbyopia, your optometrist can prescribe reading glasses, multifocals or contact lenses. Presbyopia can complicate other common vision conditions like nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. Your optometrist will determine the specific lenses to allow you to see clearly and comfortably. You may only need to wear your glasses for close work like reading, but you may find that wearing them all the time is more convenient and helpful.

The effects of presbyopia will continue over your lifetime. Therefore, you may need to periodically change your eyewear to maintain clear and comfortable vision.

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Helmwood Plaza Shopping Center

(Roses Shopping Center)

611 W. Poplar St. Suite C4A

Elizabethtown Ky. 42701

Rose's Shopping Center 

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Tel: (270)-765-EYES

       (270)-765-3937

Fax: (270)-765-6658